alluringalliteration:

wigmund:

meximeximan:

why don’t you make like a tree andwoah

Birnam Wood’s on the march

#Macbeth fandom takes a post

alluringalliteration:

wigmund:

meximeximan:

why don’t you make like a tree and

woah

Birnam Wood’s on the march

(via samantha-shakespeare)

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading.

I’d love to see this compared to a similar map of Europe, Asia, and Africa.

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading.

I’d love to see this compared to a similar map of Europe, Asia, and Africa.

(via elfsmirk)

ample-nacells asked: Hello! I'm from the spirk fandom and you've been getting a remarkable assortment of bullshit from people I (used to) follow. I feel really bad that you've been made the center of a random fandom war, and I was wondering if there was anything that I can do to help. Would you like help shooting down anons? PMing people? Anything?

lucystillintheskywithdiamonds:

hahaha thank you, that was appreciated ;)
I know this fandom well enough to not be one bit surprised by people’s vitriol when it comes to some topics. Their predictability is almost comforting.
But then, even wanky posts like that one can be useful for the Uhura and S/U fans because they have the opportunity to find, in the same place,  plenty of examples to use as future reference when they need to explain to some people why this fandom is so problematic.

ample-nacells  )

I still get spirk hate for my spock/uhura fics. It has been a useful learning experience for me as a white woman. Besides the misogyny, the racism is pretty rampant.

ibringthefireodin:

The Death of Baldur
The Norse religion stretched from Germany to Iceland and was passed down orally for thousands of years; what little we know of it comes from Christian historians. There is a lot of the variety in the tales. One of the tales with the starkest differences is the Death of Baldur. The Death of Baldur is really important because, in one version of the tale, it sets Loki up as “the Bad Guy.” Baldur was supposed to be the Golden God, the personification of spring and summer, wise and just and wonderful—at least in some of the versions of the story. In one version of the story, after premonitions of Baldur’s death, Frigga, his mother cast a spell over him to protect him from all weapons made of every sort of material except mistletoe. The gods took to throwing weapons at him and watching them bounce off. Loki gave a mistletoe dart to Hodur and helped him aim it. Obviously, in this version of the story Loki is directly responsible for Baldur’s death. (It is also probably an allegory of the change of seasons, but that is more in depth than I want to go here).In some interpretations of the story, Loki actually kills Baldur as a favor to Odin. Because Hel is the only Realm not destined to be touched by Ragnarok, the end times, putting Baldur in Hel keeps him safe and allows him to be reborn. (After Ragnarok a new, more perfect world is supposed to emerge).In a very different version of the story, Baldur falls for Nanna, a possibly human woman who has promised herself to the warlord Hothur. Baldur goes around Nanna and gets her father to agree to give Nanna to him as his bride. Nanna resists, as does her beloved Hothur. Hothur goes off, gets a magic sword, and kills Baldur. No Loki whatsoever.In all the stories of Baldur, I can’t find an incident of him doing much of anything—except trying to take Nanna against her will. But he’s always described as beautiful, wise, etc., etc. I think some of the Christian historians wanted to shoehorn the Norse myths into a Christian framework: Odin is god, Baldur is Jesus, and Loki is, of course, the devil. It becomes a simpler story that way. Good vs. Evil. If you remove Baldur’s death from the equation, Loki’s one really bad deed is killing the servant at Aegir’s feast in the beginning of the Lokasenna. The problem with that story is that some historians think that the murder was added later by Christians who thought that Loki’s binding in the cave was too harsh for simply insulting all the gods at the feast (and boy, did he insult them. Whew!)In “I Bring the Fire” I merged all three stories together to come up with my version of Baldur’s death. I made Loki (probably) the inadvertent killer of the servant—Loki was drunk, and his chaos caused the servant to die when Loki insulted him. A highly unlikely scenario—but likely with intoxication, anger, mixed with a healthy dose of chaos.Anyway, I really enjoy mixing myths. If there is every any myth that you want the “real” story for, please let me know. I’d be happy to say where I got my inspiration—and where I went completely off on my own merry way. (Sadly, the story of Rind, I did not make up at all. The only thing I did was make Loki a witness to Odin’s misdeeds.)Engraving is “Balder belurer Nanna” by Frederik Winkel Hornhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Balder_belurer_Nanna.jpg
For a fascinating discussion of how even Satan wasn’t really “evil” in the beginning, follow this link and expand the conversation with Megan Earley. She is a theology student (Ph. D. candidate? I’ll need to confirm. It’s fascinating stuff.)

ibringthefireodin:

The Death of Baldur

The Norse religion stretched from Germany to Iceland and was passed down orally for thousands of years; what little we know of it comes from Christian historians. There is a lot of the variety in the tales. One of the tales with the starkest differences is the Death of Baldur. The Death of Baldur is really important because, in one version of the tale, it sets Loki up as “the Bad Guy.” Baldur was supposed to be the Golden God, the personification of spring and summer, wise and just and wonderful—at least in some of the versions of the story. 

In one version of the story, after premonitions of Baldur’s death, Frigga, his mother cast a spell over him to protect him from all weapons made of every sort of material except mistletoe. The gods took to throwing weapons at him and watching them bounce off. Loki gave a mistletoe dart to Hodur and helped him aim it. Obviously, in this version of the story Loki is directly responsible for Baldur’s death. (It is also probably an allegory of the change of seasons, but that is more in depth than I want to go here).

In some interpretations of the story, Loki actually kills Baldur as a favor to Odin. Because Hel is the only Realm not destined to be touched by Ragnarok, the end times, putting Baldur in Hel keeps him safe and allows him to be reborn. (After Ragnarok a new, more perfect world is supposed to emerge).

In a very different version of the story, Baldur falls for Nanna, a possibly human woman who has promised herself to the warlord Hothur. Baldur goes around Nanna and gets her father to agree to give Nanna to him as his bride. Nanna resists, as does her beloved Hothur. Hothur goes off, gets a magic sword, and kills Baldur. No Loki whatsoever.

In all the stories of Baldur, I can’t find an incident of him doing much of anything—except trying to take Nanna against her will. But he’s always described as beautiful, wise, etc., etc. I think some of the Christian historians wanted to shoehorn the Norse myths into a Christian framework: Odin is god, Baldur is Jesus, and Loki is, of course, the devil. It becomes a simpler story that way. Good vs. Evil. 

If you remove Baldur’s death from the equation, Loki’s one really bad deed is killing the servant at Aegir’s feast in the beginning of the Lokasenna. The problem with that story is that some historians think that the murder was added later by Christians who thought that Loki’s binding in the cave was too harsh for simply insulting all the gods at the feast (and boy, did he insult them. Whew!)

In “I Bring the Fire” I merged all three stories together to come up with my version of Baldur’s death. I made Loki (probably) the inadvertent killer of the servant—Loki was drunk, and his chaos caused the servant to die when Loki insulted him. A highly unlikely scenario—but likely with intoxication, anger, mixed with a healthy dose of chaos.

Anyway, I really enjoy mixing myths. If there is every any myth that you want the “real” story for, please let me know. I’d be happy to say where I got my inspiration—and where I went completely off on my own merry way. (Sadly, the story of Rind, I did not make up at all. The only thing I did was make Loki a witness to Odin’s misdeeds.)

Engraving is “Balder belurer Nanna” by Frederik Winkel Horn
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Balder_belurer_Nanna.jpg

For a fascinating discussion of how even Satan wasn’t really “evil” in the beginning, follow this link and expand the conversation with Megan Earley. She is a theology student (Ph. D. candidate? I’ll need to confirm. It’s fascinating stuff.)

( Lumnus FTW. )

glitchbitch-:

I CANNOT SCROLL PAST THIS AND NOT REBLOG FUCK HAHHAHAHA

(Source: wallygervers, via lucystillintheskywithdiamonds)

Tags: dog shaming

"Several months ago, I was at a school event where a very young black girl was standing shyly off to the side as I was chatting with some 6th grade students after my presentation. She gave me her notebook and asked me to sign it, which I was glad to do. It was a book of her own poetry and short stories. I smiled and said “I’m so glad to meet a young writer!” She beamed at me and said “I love writing and I want to be a writer but I didn’t think I could because I’m not white.” I was surprised and asked her if she’d read any books by Walter Dean Myers, Angela Johnson, or Linda Sue Park. She nodded and shrugged her shoulder and said, “But I’ve never seen them in person.” To this young teen, an author of color was a mythical creature, not to be believed, until she’d seen one in person. She couldn’t believe in her dream to become a writer until she saw for herself that a real life POC had done it. This is why we must continue to fight for diversity in children’s literature. For all of our children, so that they can see that we exist and that they can believe that their dreams of becoming whatever they want, can come true."

From this great post by Ellen Oh.

This story reminds me, too, of something I always talk about which was that I never met an author until I was like 25. Until then, I didn’t think I could be one because I thought being an author was for special rich people who lived far away, probably in New York, and had some secret access to that whole world. (This was before the internet.) So I can totally imagine how a non-white kid who only ever met white authors would think the way the girl in this story does.

Adults are models of possibility. We need to model all sorts of possibility for all sorts of kids, and can’t ever assume that they just “know” about things existing that they don’t get to see and experience for themselves.

Especially when you’re a poor kid or otherwise not privileged in some way or come from an addicted family, you tend to have people around you that have those same limited and limiting beliefs. I never had goals or ambitions modeled for me by the adults in my immediate family. No one ever said I could and should try things that I wanted to do and have dreams and take risks. I learned survival and getting by, and making do with what you have and staying safe. I was a poor kid, and got that. When I multiply my own experience by a factor of also not-white, I can start to catch a tiny glimpse of what the girl in Ellen’s story and kids like her are up against.

I can stand in front of kids and talk about my background of poverty, and the dysfunction I grew up in, and I do do that, to share my own struggle to achieve a goal. But when I’m talking to a roomful of not-white kids (and I’ve been to plenty of schools like that) I know it’s not the same as if they could see someone who looks like them telling that story. Thanks, Ellen, for sharing this.

(via sarazarr)

Thank you to Sara for really understanding the importance of this issue and for caring enough to share it.

(via elloellenoh)

(via warsawmouse)

(Source: radiofort, via warsawmouse)

Tags: star wars lol

kewkitty:

Kitty does not know what to do with the butterfly that landed on its paw.

Kitty looks very conflicted.

kewkitty:

Kitty does not know what to do with the butterfly that landed on its paw.

Kitty looks very conflicted.

(via saathi1013)